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Nature takes over at the Rolls Royce facility in West Sussex

Global lockdowns have allowed the natural world to thrive in the absence of humans, and the English luxury marque is no exception.

It’s almost unheard of to associate an automobile manufacturer with thriving natutre; but these aren’t ordinary times. Luxury marque Rolls Royce has announced that nature has thrived in its “Home”, the Rolls-Royce Global Centre of Luxury Manufacturing Excellence located in West Sussex in England.

With most activities ceasing at the centre due to lockdowns between 24 March and 4 May, flora and fauna have been given the chance to flourish without human intervention. In turn, the marque has taken measures to make the best of the phenomenon.

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 65 of the compound’s “celebrated” lime trees — which had overgrown during the period — have been given “precision laser guided” trims in anticipation with the marque’s clients.

The various wildfowl that occupy the compound — which includes ducks, moorhens, swans and herons — have produced much young during the period. These chicks, however, while charmingly adorable, are high vulnerable to traffic. To protect them, Rolls Royce has installed warning signs for drivers at crossing points on its grounds.

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Nature at Rolls Royce

One of the most popular attractions on the ground is the Goodwood Apiary, which was established in 2017, with 250, 000 English honey bees housed in traditional UK-crafted wooden hives. The bees have access to Rolls Royce’s 42-acre plot, which includes a massive 8 acre living roof filled with sedum or stonecrop – a family of hardy, perennial plants favoured by pollinators. The insects’ honey — which production has continued in full swing during the lockdown — is given to the customers.

Torsten Müller-Ötvös, Chief Executive Officer, Rolls-Royce Motor Cars, says, “One of the most striking outcomes from the Covid-19 lockdown has been the huge surge in people’s awareness and appreciation of the natural world…we’ve come back to work determined to ensure our ‘new normal’ is even more focused on our relationship with nature.” 

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