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Fujifilm Business Innovation and The Peak explores the fourth industrial revolution

As businesses begin to see the need for smart technology in their services, we get insight from three CEOs on their plans.

All SMM guidelines were followed during the filming of this virtual seminar, including the cover image (left to right: Koh Ching Hong, Lai Chang Wen, Victor Lee, Farhan Shah)

On 1 September, a seminar jointly organised by The Peak and Fujifilm Business Innovation saw three leading members of very different industries share their insights about the fourth industrial revolution. They were Lai Chang Wen, CEO of Ninja Van, Koh Ching Hong, CEO of Fujifilm Business Innovation Singapore and Victor Lee, CEO of CIMB Singapore.

Moderated by Farhan Shah, Editor-in-Chief of The Peak, the issues of technology and labour revolved around the rise of automation, artificial intelligence and smart machines. Now that we’re on the cusp of the fourth industrial revolution, at the tail end of the digital revolution, most of the discussion centred on seamlessly integrating smart hardware and software.

A consideration for Lai was the varying degrees of technology available in the present time; technology might be smart but not smart enough, yet. “We use a lot of [the term] ‘AI’ and people always assume it means ‘artificial intelligence’… We like to coin the word [to mean] ‘artificial intuition’, which is one level below [‘artificial intelligence’],” he explained.

In this sense, Ninja Van taps on technology to ensure consistency in quality for tasks that need human resources. He added, “I think it is important that it (artificial intelligence) is not applied to anybody and everybody in the same manner.”

Fujifilm Business Innovation CEO Koh Ching Hong.

Fujifilm Business Innovation CEO Koh Ching Hong.

A viewer asked the speakers for their most innovative plans. Lee shared that CIMB has started digitising almost all of its services while Lai has implemented real-time updates on Ninja Van’s customers’ delivery preferences. For Koh, he explains that Fujifilm now can remotely conduct preventive maintenance on its devices. It has also digitised paper documents into virtual ones.

As the rest of the world adapts and adopts emerging technologies, having the readiness and foresight to keep one step ahead will benefit companies, especially smaller enterprises in the long run.

At Fujifilm Business Innovation Singapore, they’ve developed a “virtual CIO” (Chief Information Officer) that offers advice to small businesses looking to digitise their services. Built on a subscription model, it can point SMEs in the right direction without spending too much capital or time.

Watch highlights from the discussion below to see how you can prepare your company for the fourth industrial revolution.

The conversation does not end here. Fujifilm Business Innovation Singapore is hosting its flagship event, the Fujifilm Inno-Vision Forum 2021 on 10 and 11 November, where industry leaders will share how they have revolutionised innovation to maximise impact for their organisations. Register here today.