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Tiffany & Co’s first engagement rings for men are now for sale

It’s 2021 - and about time grooms get to show off some bling.

We’ve come a long way from the times where sealing a marriage involves a transfer of livestock. We’ve come even longer from the times where who had the biggest club (and the ability to wield it) dictates one’s matrimonial choices. That said, there’s nothing wrong with good ol’ tradition – and any noveau twists to age-old formulas.

After all, it’s 2021. Men still propose to women on bended knee – but so can women. New York-based jewellers Tiffany & Co certainly think so, as they’ve just launched a line of engagement rings for the less-than-fair sex for the first time in 184 years of business.

(Related: Tiffany & Co launches a collection for men)

Tiffany’s series of five engagement rings aimed at the male market are dubbed The Charles Tiffany Setting after the brand’s founder who, back in 1886, introduced the original six-prong Tiffany Setting. The Charles Tiffany Setting does away with wedding bands in favour of something more akin to its iconic sibling – that is, a solitaire diamond-clad ring. 

tiffany-mens-engagement-ring

PT SEC Men’s Engagement SDR 4.30ct SEC,PT EC Men’s Engagement SDR 2.85ct SEC, Black TNN/PT EC Men’s Engagement SDR 3.36ct, PT RD Men’s Engagement SDR 3.92ct, Gray TNN/PT EC Men’s Engagement SDR 3.01ct

The signet-esque rings come either in titanium or platinum, and will be available with round, or emerald-cut diamonds of up to five carats instead of insignias. Naturally, they’re a little blockier and bolder than their female-focused counterparts.  

(Related: The latest and most talked-about jewellery collections)

The collection is a slightly more tempered challenge to traditional notions of masculinity, than, say, Harry Styles donning a dress. But it’s a welcome one, especially since courtship and its rituals are becoming increasingly outdated (why can’t a woman open a car door herself?). The Charles Tiffany Setting also serves as a way to pave the road for “love and inclusivity” in a modern age while celebrating our personal love stories and cherished commitments to each other, says the press release.

Either way, this isn’t the first way the jewellers are attempting to bring social awareness to the diamond market. They pride themselves on delivering highly traceable diamonds, whether it be the age-old Tiffany Setting or its newer cousin. Every step in the supply chain – including the diamond’s origin, and site of cutting, polishing and grading – will be available and provided as a part of their diamond certificate. At the very least, it’s a way to make diamonds just that bit more ethical – while championing the ability to look good when betrothed. 

More information at the Tiffany & Co website.