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Mauro Colagreco, chef of three-Michelin-starred Mirazur, is opening a burger restaurant in Singapore

The restaurant, called Carne, brings a farm-to-table ethos to a fast food staple: the burger.

Burgers, or fast food in general, aren’t really the first things that come to mind when you think of ethical eating. After all, the very idea of fast food – that is, getting produce from wherever’s cheapest and replicating tasty, if unhealthful, grub en masse – doesn’t sound all that thoughtful. 

Italian-Argentinian chef Mauro Colagreco, who topped the World’s 50 Best Restaurants list in his personal capacity as well as his three-Michelin-starred restaurant Mirazur, has been working on changing that conception. Enter Carne, a sustainable hamburger joint, coming to Amoy Street in February 2021.

(Related: How Singapore can get better at feeding herself)

The budding chain boasts three stores and two franchises already in Buenos Aires, Argentina, and a further two franchises on the way in other provinces. In fact, the branch in Singapore will be the brand’s first international outpost – a curious choice, then, considering Carne’s focus on sourcing from local farmers. After all, Singapore’s journey to self-sustaining food production is an arduous one – a far cry from other land-rich nations teeming with orchards, farms, and greenhouses.

(Related: World’s 50 Best Restaurants Awards 2019: The full list of winners)

CARNE - Burger

Despite that, Carne’s four-year mission is going smoothly – they became the first hamburger chain in the world to become a Certified B Corporation, an accolade for businesses committed to promoting sustainability and the betterment of the world. 

It’s an ethos, in fact, that isn’t just central to Carne, but Colagreco himself – the nomenclature of Mirazur’s dishes typically involves the suppliers’ names front-and-centre, which is all part of his philosophy of celebrating good produce and producers. 

(Related: Kotuwa: A love letter to Sri Lankan food)

That goes for the burgers as well, done up simply with farm-fresh, high quality ingredients that tell the story of the farms they came from. 

It’s a form of luxury in itself – ensuring that the meal’s impact on the environment, whether it be social, political or ecological, is only positive. By changing the paradigm of food production, fast food like the burger might one day, be quick, tasty and guilt-free no matter how you think about it.