private dining

Photo: Pan Pacific Orchard

Private dining rooms offer much more than discretion for corporate pow-wows and festive gatherings. These hidden spaces often function as a creative outlet for establishments, giving them free rein to flex their aesthetic chops with design elements that are a little more avant-garde, sentimental, or plain irreverent than what is acceptable in the main dining room.

That same creative freedom can be found in the plates and platters wending their way to these discreet havens, in recognition of the fact that private dining rooms are often booked by the discerning and adventurous.

Read on for a list of new private dining spaces, ranging from the gorgeously appointed and classy to the downright cosy.

1. Calligraphy, conviviality, and Cantonese cuisine at Pan Pacific Orchard’s The Chairman’s Lounge

private dining
Photo: Pan Pacific Orchard

The nature-first Pan Pacific Orchard hotel follows up on its grand opening last June with The Chairman’s Lounge, an exclusive sanctuary serving fine Cantonese cuisine for convivial gatherings of up to 16.

Expect culinary flairs with premium seasonal ingredients ranging from Australian rock lobster to wild-caught soon hock and bird’s nests anchored on Cantonese cuisine’s well-balanced, punchy flavours. Guangdong-born Chinese master chef Leung Wing Cheung leads the kitchen, wielding over 40 years of experience at establishments in Hong Kong and Singapore — including Si Chuan Dou Hua, where he last served as executive chef. 

The comfortable space provides more than a mere private dining experience, as it is sumptuously appointed with artistic savoir-faire in the form of a 20-panel calligraphy oeuvre — aptly celebrating conviviality, feasting, and imbibing — by the late Chua Ek Kay, winner of Singapore’s apex art prize, the Cultural Medallion. 

Find out more here.

2. Bring on the heat with Revolver’s new tasting menu, exclusive to its private dining room

private dining
Photo: Revolver

Revolver is no stranger to bringing on the heat when it comes to its contemporary grill-focused Indian plates, both in terms of layering hearty proteins and seafood with the subcontinent’s rich tapestry of spices, as well as the judicious use of fire and flame from its custom woodfire grill, smoker, and tandoor oven.

It’s only natural for the restaurant — now in its third year of operation on Tras Street — to turn up the heat to 11 for its newly opened private dining room with a tasting menu exclusive to the intimate venue.

The Spread, as the restaurant calls it, is said to be a collection of individual plates and large-format platters that best represent Revolver’s cuisine. These range from elevated street snacks like the burrata tokri chaat, featuring the pillowy cheese layered with sun-dried tomatoes, chimichurri, and caviar, to indulgent sharing portions of Japanese king crab, turbot, and a hulking tomahawk kissed by smoke and spices. All this is available in a private room for 14, fully equipped with a bar, wine cellar, and sound system.

Find out more here.

3. Chef Chan’s Private Dine presents Cantonese fine dining with a touch of colonial charm

private dining
Photo: Chef Chan Private Dine

The latest incarnation of chef Chan’s Private Dine can now be found in a black-and-white bungalow at 35 Scotts Road, just down the road from its previous perch at number 27. Chef Wong Hong Loong, a protege of the eponymous chef Chan Chen Hei, continues to helm the outfit, having worked under the legendary chef at his restaurant in Odeon Towers (set up after Chan left Hai Tien Lo, where he first made his name).

As its name suggests, the restaurant continues to run like an ultra-exclusive dining club, serving only two tables of eight at a time — already an improvement from its previous locale, where a group of ten meant a full dining room. 

Familiar favourites like the chef’s signature crispy roast chicken make an expected return, along with a host of other tempting Cantonese fine dining treats like wok-fried kway teow with an indulgent crab roe gravy, poached Australian cabbage with a double-boiled chicken broth, and freshly steamed spotted grouper with homemade tofu and egg white.

Find out more here.

4. Side Door

private dining
Photo: Side Door

Side Door is the brainchild of chef Tryson Quek — previously chef de cuisine at Anti:dote and Stamford Brasserie — and his better half, Bannie Kang, once Anti:dote’s head bartender. The 40-seat restaurant-bar concept culminates the various experiences dotting the couples’ culinary careers.

There are Asian-inflected bar bites like blue-lipped mussels with burnt butter, chilli garlic, and grilled sourdough, along with handcrafted cocktails and spirits in the main dining room, drawing from the years the couple spent in Taipei running their award-winning gastrobar Mu (now-defunct).

There’s also an eight-course menu with beverage pairings exclusive to The Living Room, a cosy private lounge for six to eight — an experience reminiscent of the private home dining outfit the couple ran out of their apartment after returning to Singapore.

Elevated plates on the menu — which changes periodically — include Korean-style slow-cooked Wagyu short ribs paired with garlic rice and oyster tartare with a watermelon salsa. Bookings must be made at least three days in advance via Side Door’s Instagram.

Find out more here.